Mississippi Knife Laws

Summary

Mississippi is one of those states that comes down hard if felons try to exercise their Second Amendment rights.  I don’t know how popular my opinions are, but when the Founders said those initial rights are inalienable, I believe that it means no government has the right to deny someone them.  They aren’t privileges, they’re necessities.

That being said, Mississippi doesn’t have very outlandish laws.  There are no illegal knives, although there are restrictions on who can own a knife or who you can give or sell a knife to.  Namely, minors, intoxicated people, and convicted felons cannot be given knives such as Bowie knives, dirks, switchblades, or even butcher knives.

What Kinds of Knives are Legal in Mississippi?

Mississippi generally doesn’t restrict knives, only who can own certain types.  Anyone who isn’t drunk, under 18, or convicted of a felony can own any knife they like.  There are a few restrictions on carrying, though.

  • You can own any knife, including switchblade, Bowie, disguised, daggers, dirks, etc.
  • You can openly carry any knife
  • You can carry a concealed knife if it’s in your vehicle
  • You can carry a concealed knife if it’s in relation to a sport where such a knife is legitimately used

What Kinds of Knives are Illegal in Mississippi?

Thankfully, there are no restricted knives in Mississippi.  That said, there are restrictions regarding carrying knives, some of which are more strict than other states.  I mean, I still don’t understand the butcher knife thing.

  • You cannot conceal-carry a Bowie knife
  • You cannot conceal-carry a switchblade or other automatic knife
  • You cannot conceal-carry a dirk knife
  • You cannot conceal-carry a butcher knife
  • Minors and convicted felons cannot own Bowie knives
  • Minors and convicted felons cannot own switchblades or automatic knives
  • Minors and convicted felons cannot own butcher knives
  • Minors and convicted felons cannot own dirks
  • You cannot bring your knife to school or other ‘educational property’ (don’t bring your knife to any school function, on buses, etc.)

There are a few exceptions here, though.  Defenses against these regulations may be raised by church security program members, law enforcement officers, mail carriers, and military personnel.  Exceptions also exist for people traveling far away, so long as they aren’t a ‘tramp’.

Relevant Statutes

Leave a Comment