Utah Knife Laws

Summary

Utah’s laws look confusing at first glance, but it’s fairly easy to work them out.  As long as you’ve never been convicted of a felony, Utah’s knife laws are quite relaxed.  They are, however, one of those states that really crack down on people who have committed crimes in the past, limiting the knives they can own and carry.

What Kinds of Knives are Legal in Utah?

Utah doesn’t restrict the owning and carrying of any knife by those who have never been convicted of a felony.   There are no laws regulating the concealed carrying of knives, so I would assume that it’s legal.  I’m not a lawyer, however, so consult with an attorney.

  • All knives are legal, including switchblades, penknives, Bowie knives, butterfly knives, disguised knives, etc.
  • All forms of carrying seem to be legal

What Kinds of Knives are Illegal in Utah?

Utah doesn’t prohibit any knives or their carrying except by certain persons.  Unfortunately, the list is exhaustive!

  • You cannot quarrel or threaten someone with a dangerous weapon
  • Convicted felons cannot own or carry dangerous weapons
  • Persons on probation or parole for a felony cannot possess dangerous weapons
  • If you have been adjudicated delinquent for a crime that, had it been committed by an adult, would have been a felony in the past 7 years, you cannot possess a dangerous weapon
  • Persons who unlawfully use controlled substances cannot possess dangerous weapons
  • Persons who have been found not guilty by reason of insanity for a felony offense cannot possess dangerous weapons
  • Persons who have been declared mentally incompetent to stand trial for a felony cannot possess dangerous weapons
  • Persons who have been committed to a mental facility cannot possess dangerous weapons
  • If you were dishonorably discharged from the armed forces, you cannot possess dangerous weapons
  • If you are in the US illegally or not a citizen, you cannot possess dangerous weapons.
  • You cannot bring your knife to school

What’s a Dangerous Weapon?

(6) (a) “Dangerous weapon” means: (i) a firearm; or (ii) an object that in the manner of its use or intended use is capable of causing death or serious bodily injury. (b) The following factors are used in determining whether any object, other than a firearm, is a dangerous weapon: (i) the location and circumstances in which the object was used or possessed; (ii) the primary purpose for which the object was made; (iii) the character of the wound, if any, produced by the object’s unlawful use; (iv) the manner in which the object was unlawfully used; (v) whether the manner in which the object is used or possessed constitutes a potential imminent threat to public safety; and (vi) the lawful purposes for which the object may be used.

Relevant Statutes

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